I'm Elia, and this is my library blog. I am an MLIS student at Florida State University, and I have a pop culture addiction. This is my blog for library-related things, some politics, and occasionally celebrities or tv shows.

I don't actually plan parties.

 

tamorapierce:

chewiesmiles:

via Mike Brown: Facts and dog whistles by Jonathan Korman (@miniver)

Part I here

I don’t care if he was smoking a doobie a mile long, it wasn’t a shooting offense.  Stealing cigars, if true, wasn’t a shooting offense.  He could have been letting air out of the tires of the chief’s fucking tires and it still wouldn’t be a shooting offense, you know why?  THERE IS NO CRIME IN THIS COUNTRY THAT IS A SHOOTING OFFENSE.  Even if he’d been jailed, arraigned, gone through all the procedures of court for felony murder in a death penalty state, been found guilty and exhausted all of his appeals, no one could shoot him.  As it was, he was walking down the street.

Walking.  Because that’s what dangerous guilty horrible criminal persons do in this country, friends and neighbors, they walk down the street, ignoring the police officer in such a perverse, vicious, and heinous manner that the police officer, protecting and serving his tightly gripped ass off, shoots him.  Multiple times.  Because everyone knows the white policeman would never just plain haul off and shoot an innocent man in these United Racist States.

I hate this.  There will never be justice here.  Never.

jetpack-johnny asked
medusa isn't a tragic hero or a victim. nice try being a dumb ass you have succeeded quite nicely

mildlyamused:

It’s nice to see you ignore things like links, and facts, and historical evidence of the Medusa myth being lifted wholesale from the North African culture that deified female intelligence. 

Nothing symbolic about the favored child of the new deity helping to murder the old. Nope. Not at all. 

image

Tag Game: Characters who have the same personality as you!

If you don’t know your personality type, take the test HERE!

I was tagged by: nerdacious

Rules: Find out what characters share the same personality type as you here and list the characters that you find relevant below. Then tag five friends and let them know you tagged them! 

Type:  ISFJ (Protector)

Characters:

I love all of these so much.

Tagging: scribblesnorton analoguerock alacris-ashley archivalintegrity  emileeeeeeeey

ohheysarahc:

glitterlion:

afro-dominicano:

reminder that ya boy bill gates (along with his bill and melinda gates foundation) invest in the very private prisons that create a demand for more black/brown bodies

ps. Melinda Gates/the foundation has an obsession with figuring out how to control the reproductive decisions of African women, particularly in Ethiopia and Nigeria.

Holy fuck this is true
http://m.motherjones.com/environment/2013/12/gates-foundations-24-most-egregious-investments

essentialwandering:

bsw-msw-wwe:

These power and control wheels were found in “Foundation concepts for social justice-based therapy: Critical consciousness, accountability, and empowerment”

Helpful.
Why can’t this be some of the stuff they show people in “health” class?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:


EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa


Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.
Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.
Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.
A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:


These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.
By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.
 At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu. 
By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s. 


So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.
Also, as an additional consideration:


With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States. 


Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.
It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.
One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.
Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.
As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?
I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.
Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

medievalpoc:

aresnergal:

medievalpoc:

lyricsja:

EUROPEANS TAUGHT FOR CENTURIES that Africa had no written history, literature or philosophy (claiming Egypt was other than African). When roughly 1 MILLION manuscripts were found in Timbuktu/Mali covering , according to Reuters “all the fields of human knowledge: law, the sciences, medicine,” IT DID NOT MAKE MAINSTREAM NEWS as did the lies taught by Europeans concerning Africa

Someone asked me to somehow “verify” that this story is real.

Of course it’s real! The PROBLEM with the coverage regarding these manuscripts is that they’re constantly portrayed as being in “danger” because many of them are still in the possession of Malian descendants. About 700,000 have been cataloged so far, and they have had to be moved in part because apparently extremist groups have tried to firebomb them. Many others are still in the possession of the families they have been passed down in.

Some of these collected manuscripts are being housed in exile, but mold and humidity have been a constant threat. They have been raising funds to try and preserve these manuscripts-you can read more about the project to house and protect them here.

A bit of the history of these manuscripts from National Geographic:

These sacred manuscripts covered an array of subjects: astronomy, medicine, mathematics, chemistry, judicial law, government, and Islamic conflict resolution. Islamic study during this period of human history, when the intellectual evolution had stalled in the rest of Europe was growing, evolving, and breaking new ground in the fields of science, mathematics, astronomy, law, and philosophy within the Muslim world.

By the 1300s the “Ambassadors of Peace” centered around the University of Timbuktu created roving scholastic campuses and religious schools of learning that traveled between the cities of Timbuktu, Gao, and Djénné, helping to serve as a model of peaceful governance throughout an often conflict-riddled tribal region.

At its peak, over 25,000 students attended the University of Timbuktu.

By the beginning of the 1600s with the Moroccan invasions from the north, however, the scholars of Timbuktu began to slowly drift away and study elsewhere. As a result, the city’s sacred manuscripts began to fall into disrepair. While Islamic teachings there continued for another 300 years, the biggest decline in scholastic study occurred with the French colonization of present-day Mali in the late 1890s.

So yeah, basically the story of this collection’s source more or less ends with “…but unfortunately, colonialism”, as do most of the great cities of Africa, the Americas, and some parts of Asia.

Also, as an additional consideration:

With the pressures of poverty, a series of droughts, and a tribal Tureg rebellion in Mali that lasted over ten years, the manuscripts continue to disappear into the black market, where they are illegally sold to private and university collections in Europe and the United States.

Notice where the blame is placed here via language use: on the people in poverty forced to sell their treasures, as opposed to the Universities in Europe and the U.S. buying them.

It’s really just another face of Neocolonialism.

Fun fact: I only learned about that library by playing one of the Civilization games where it exists as a wonder

One of the many reasons why Medievalpoc is also about representation in all types of media.

One of the most important ways the past affects us all today is the media we create about it. History is a story, and a story bears the mark of each teller it passes through. So, each time we tell a story, we have the power to shape it as it passes through us, to others.

Whether we’re writing textbooks, fiction, or articles; sharing something on Facebook, teaching a class, playing a game, or texting our moms, we make choices in how we phrase things and frame information. When you hold things in your mind, like the Library of Timbuktu, and think about how it interacts with everything else you know, it will affect your words and behavior, which in turn affects the people around you.

As I wrote about yesterday, Colonialism in many ways involves telling lies about entire nations and peoples, and using power, ruthlessness, and brutality to make them into almost-truths. After all, if you burn the manuscripts of an entire people and then tell them they have no history; if you make teaching what remains of their history illegal, is that not violence? Is that not genocide?

I’m sure there are those who would call that an exaggeration or hyperbole, but these are often the selfsame folks who are moved to violence to defend the idea the European history is populated entirely and without exception by people we in the U.S. would consider white today. We can pretend all we like that this vision of an all-white historical Europe came from nothing, no one, and nowhere, as if it is undiluted truth that comes to us untainted by centuries of colonialism. But the facts are that you can point to specific moments, authors, and articles that show the turning points; that show these ideas being born. You can read Race Mixture in the Roman Empire by Frank Tenney (from 1916) and see how articles like these shaped American views of race in antiquity; how the racism of 1916 was imposed onto Classical Antiquity. And these are the same people who decided that an entire continent did not have books, had no written history.

Why do we know what we know? Where does it come from? And how does the media we are creating today reflect it?

It’s interesting that you have a number of directors and showrunners out there who just have all caucasian casts. Now, they see color. They may not tell you. And you know why they won’t tell you? Because you won’t put them to task… So they will continue doing what they’re doing and they’re the ones who really need to be pushed in that direction. Shonda doesn’t have the problem.

Viola Davis, on why Shonda Rhimes is the wrong person to ask about diversity [x] (via buzzfeedent)

cognitivedissonance:

postracialcomments:

When Ronald Ritchie called 911 from the aisles of a Walmart in western Ohio last month to report that a black man was “walking around with a gun in the store”, he said that shoppers were coming under direct threat. “He’s, like, pointing it at people,

Ritchie told the dispatcher. Later that evening, after John Crawford III had been shot dead by one of the police officers who hurried to the scene in Beavercreek, Ritchie repeated to reporters:

“He was pointing at people. Children walking by.”

One month later, Ritchie puts it differently. “At no point did he shoulder the rifle and point it at somebody,” the 24-year-old said, in an interview with the Guardian.

He maintained that Crawford was “waving it around”, which attorneys for Crawford’s family deny.

Ritchie told several reporters after the 5 August shooting that he was an “ex-marine”. When confronted with his seven-week service record, however, he confirmed that he had been quickly thrown out of the US marine corps in 2008 after being declared a “fraudulent enlistment”, over what he maintains was simply a mixup over his paperwork.

Crawford, 22, turned out to be holding an unloaded BB air rifle that he had picked up from a store shelf. After Ritchie said Crawford appeared to be “trying to load” the gun, the 911 dispatcher relayed to an officer that it was believed the gunman “just put some bullets inside”.

The Crawfords’ attorneys told the Guardian that they had learned the preliminary findings of an autopsy were that he was shot in the back of his left arm and in his left side, supporting their claim that he was turned away from the police officer who shot him.

They have pleaded with Mike DeWine, Ohio’s attorney general, to release the store’s surveillance footage of the shooting to the public. Having viewed it, they say that it disproves Ritchie’s version of what led to the deaths of both Crawford and a 37-year-old woman who collapsed and died in the ensuing panic.

“It was an execution, no doubt about it,” alleged Crawford’s father, John Crawford II. “It was flat-out murder. And when you see the footage, it will illustrate that.”

DeWine has said that releasing the footage would be “playing with dynamite” and prevent any trial from being fair

The attorneys said that they would also be lodging a complaint with DeWine after Ritchie told the Guardian that he, too, was shown the surveillance footage by officials in the attorney general’s bureau of criminal investigation, who are investigating the shooting.

From this point, the Crawford team’s description of what is shown in the surveillance footage differs radically from Ritchie’s recollection, which he insisted was also backed up by the recordings from the Walmart cameras.

Crawford’s father and attorneys said that the footage showed the 22-year-old walking from one aisle to the next with the BB rifle at his side and in his left hand, pointed at the floor except for one notable movement.

“I would think that the rifle maybe got heavy to him,” said his father. “He kind of swung it like you carry it on your shoulder, then he immediately put it back down.” “You can clearly see people walk past him, and they didn’t think anything about it.

Everybody was just kind of minding their own business,” his father added. “He wasn’t acting in any type of way that he would have been considered menacing, if you will.

SOURCE

This is beyond troubling. 

But if you’re a white dude actually harassing people: http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/09/01/armed-open-carry-activists-crash-ohio-anti-gun-violence-rally-and-harass-protesters/

I suppose that’s a-OK.

micdotcom:

Bailey’s attempt to crowd fund her abortion exposed GoFundMe’s absurd double standard

GoFundMe, which claims its objective is to promote “Crowdfunding for Everyone,” made a big play to limit exactly who “everyone” is by outlawing fundraising for specific causes, including abortion and sorcery.

The impetus for the site’s new guidelines was the recent campaign of a young woman named Bailey who was attempting to raise money for an abortion. 

This is becoming a trend in America  

So these kickstarters are totally ok but raising money to have an abortion is not…..